Matthew Gdovin, Ph.D. to Present at the 2nd International Prostate Cancer Symposium and Inaugural World Congress of Urologic Satellite Session

VITANOVA BIOMEDICAL PRESS RELEASE September 1, 2017
(SAN ANTONIO, Texas) – Matthew Gdovin, Ph.D., University of Texas – San Antonio Professor and Chief Science Officer of Vitanova Biomedical, the San Antonio, Texas-based biotech company dedicated to delivering transformative cancer therapy utilizing their patented Light-Activated Intracellular Acidosis (LAIA) platform technology, will present at the 2nd International Prostate Cancer Symposium and Inaugural World Congress of Urologic Oncology being held September 6-9, 2017 in New York, NY. Read More.

Photodynamic Acidification Therapy to Reduce Triple Negative Breast Cancer Growth in Vivo

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY June 6, 2016
Breast cancer, though much researched, continues to claim the lives of more than half a million women worldwide each year; triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 15-25% of these mortalities. Treatment options for TNBC are limited to surgery, radiation, and a select few chemotherapies, to which the cancer often becomes resistant. Cancer cells maintain a more basic intracellular pH (pHi ) than healthy cells, making disruption of pH dynamics a potential target for treatment. Read More.

UTSA Researchers Spark a Revolution in Cancer Treatment

THE RIVARD REPORT February 22, 2016
The excitement in the lab was palpable as Dr. Matthew Gdovin, associate professor in the Department of Biology at UTSA, described the ground-breaking research that may change the way we treat cancer. This new treatment, Photodynamic Therapy, causes no side effects and is effective in killing some of the most difficult to cure cancers. Read More.

New, non-invasive method developed to wipe out cancerous tumors

SCIENCE DAILY June 27, 2016
A newly patented method to kill cancer cells has been developed by an American lab. This discovery may tremendously help people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors, as well as young children stricken with cancer. Read More.